IC Fundraiser coming this Sunday

Italy is More than a Place...It's an Idea!
Celebrate La Dolce Vita at Idea Capital’s Annual Fundraiser
Sunday, June 11 from 4-7 p.m. at Villa de Murph.
 
Join Idea Capital’s steering committee, supporters, artists and arts patrons at the stunning West End architecture studio of BLDGS for a celebration of the launch of our 2017 grant cycle.

A limited number of "early bird tickets" are available at a special price of $15 each. Regular advance tickets are priced at $25 per person and $40 per couple.  In addition, please consider making a larger donation to the 2017 grant fund at the party, on our website or here on Eventbrite. 
 
Partygoers will enjoy a taste of the Italian countryside in Atlanta’s burgeoning creative nexus, home to the West End Trail expansion of the Atlanta BeltLine and a community of artists and urban pioneers. We’ll raise money to support Idea Capital’s next grant cycle while enjoying a taste of Italy with cocktails, food and décor inspired by the country’s cuisine, culture and la dolce vita. Our supporters will be entertained by our talented grant winners, enjoy delicious bites from culinary diva Alisa Barry, creator of Bella Cucina Artful Food, and rock to the sounds of DJ Ben Coleman. Our friend Katie Rice will select an assortment of Italian wines from Barcelona VinoTecafor our drinking pleasure.
 
Supporting Atlanta artists working across all disciplines to create edgy innovative work will have a genuine impact on our Atlanta arts community. Please secure your tickets and donate generously to ensure another banner year for Idea Capital and the talented artists that we support with our grants.

We hope you will join in celebrating the launch of our 2017 fundraising campaign!

Most Sincerely,

The Idea Capital Steering Committee
Cubby West, Felicia Feaster, Jess Bernhart, Jody Fausett, Louise Shaw, Mary Stanley, Michael Gibson, Oronike Odeleye and Sam Romo
 
About Idea Capital
Idea Capital is a grassroots initiative founded in 2008 to help jump start Atlanta-based artist-initiated projects that might not otherwise be supported through mainstream arts institutions.  The organization and its grants are entirely funded through donations from artists and other arts supporters in the Atlanta community. The Steering Committee, who administer the grant process and fundraising efforts, voluntarily donate their time and expertise. In 2009, Idea Capital teamed with the regional arts activist organization Alternate Roots, which allowed Idea Capital participants to make their investments tax-deductible. Idea Capital encourages the Atlanta community to become investors in arts innovation in Atlanta by making an online donation

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IC Interview: Laura Noel

We wanted to check in with some of our grant winners in a series of art interviews. Laura Noel's work looks at chance encounter, the public and private, and the idea of time. Her work travels from photography and words and now to sculpture. 

 

Where were you born? Atlanta

What are your favorite materials to work with? I love all sorts of paper, including lists, bills and notes found on the street, shipping labels, construction paper and old books. I also love stencils that have been painted over a hundred times. 

In the past materials were not as important to me since I was working mainly in photography. Now that I am branching out into installation art and collage, I am getting interested in fabric. I recently made a series of four ponchos for a project called The Empathy Experiment that is showing at ArtFields in April. Each fabric is made of a different material that represents an emotion or economic status - burlap, wool for a man’s suit, satin and this odd padded upholstery fabric. So I really like the way the fabric suggests a story line - visitors are encouraged to wear each poncho and imagine themselves in someone else’s life when they wear the pieces. 

What is your motivating factor in creating artistic work? I am obsessed with the passage of time - the futility of trying to stop time from progressing really distresses me. Creating art or writing or producing something that has the potential to outlast me is a kind of bulwark against time. I am also really interested in language. I hear phrases on the radio all the time that inspire projects - just yesterday I heard someone say “blood and treasure,” and while I haven’t thought of anything to make in response to that phrase yet, I know it will percolate in my mind until something is formed. About half of my photographic projects began because of a phrase I heard. Oddly the phrase usually comes first, then the work - it is not about naming something I have already created. A new photographic project about the strange inability to know your own self is called The Inside Dog Barks the Loudest - hearing a friend utter that phrase, gave me clarity for the project. 

What do you like most about the art that you make? I have the ability to notice moments and details around me, and this gift of seeing is in my best photographs. I always go through phases with my work where I love it, I hate it and then after some time goes by I can objectively edit the good from the ordinary.

Sometimes I am touched by the permanence a really special piece of art has for me - it seems less temporary than some relationships or events.

Who are your influences?

My first artistic loves were the great street photographers: Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alex Webb, Gary Winogrand, Diane Arbus and Sylvia Plachy. I still love street photography and shoot all the time, but most of the time when I photograph life moving around me, I am building an archive of images that I will use later in some kind of narrative way. Making photo books is another passion. There is this brilliant photo novel called And Every Day was Overcast by Paul Kwiatkowski that really socked me in the gut. My style is nothing like his snapshot aesthetic, but the way he was able to combine text and images in such a moving way inspired me to do something similar in my own voice.

sylvia-plachy-alldayeveryday-everybodysteet-original-02a63b004d7d2ae075c36a2cc9d6f0e2.jpeg

The first art you saw that informed your practice and let you know this was possibility to become an artist? Having an undergraduate professor show the class The Americans was groundbreaking for me. I was a junior and had never seriously taken photos before. I was a Public Policy major, but after that class, I pursued photography in a very single minded way. The idea of making art was new to me. I assumed I’d be some kind of professional person like an attorney or a political consultant.

What do you feel you are trying to communicate with your work? Though ideas about time and its inaccessibility is a current that runs through a lot of my work, each project I do has a different meaning. My work is not always about one intense overarching theme. I made several bodies of photographs about American individuality. I admire people who have a strong sense of themselves and fully inhabit their own stories - though I am more interested in people who do this quietly than in activists.

As an artist, do you think you work is political? Sometimes my work is political, but my own viewpoint is often neutral within the art, itself. I do make art about public policy decisions and social trends/changes in society that affect people. For example, I spent 10 years off and on photographing smokers in light of the ban on public smoking. Some would say that is a political issue - health care is political. I am more interested in the psychological reasons people smoke and the idea of being a kind of social refugee forced into solitary spaces because of a habit, though of course, it is a deadly one.

I did go to both political conventions last summer - I am just now putting that work together - it’s called Outside Convention - I was not credentialed as media, and I was interested in what was happening on the fringes of both Cleveland and Philadelphia - the theater of the street. Big events like conventions heighten the drama that is already present and good pictures reveal themselves.

What are you working on currently?  I am working on several projects. Most importantly I am putting the finishing touches on my book, The Lookout, which I received an Idea Capital Grant for. The Lookout is a book of found poetry and street photography. The viewer senses the presence of other people in the images and reads their spoken words, but can’t see anyone. It is beautiful and eerie all at once. I am about to shop the book to publishers and apply for various contests for book dummies. 

My second major new project is tentatively called Books That Won’t Open - this is an assemblage piece made of books that have been altered in sort of brutal or very permanent ways, like being painted shut or reshaped as sculptures.

And last but not least I have spent the last two years working on several new bodies of photographic work that are showcased on my new site - www.amaterialwitness.com. The work is very different from my previous photographs that were all based on places and people that are around me. The new projects use still life images made formally in the studio and work that is created inside software to address issues of time and the self. I am interested in the idea that a person has to get to know themselves, even though they are their own inescapable subject. This sort of internal monolog needed to be explored in ways that are new to me, which is why I have shifted the way I work so much. 

Those new bodies of work are called Marmoreal, Crawling Backwards and The Inside Dog Barks the Loudest.

JF

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closing reception for Steve Morrison at Eyedrum this Saturday

Exhibition of Steve Morrison's show at Eyedrum is closing with a reception this Saturday. Steve is one of this year's Idea Capital Grant Winners. 


Closing: February 11, 8p-10pm
Gallery hours: Saturday 12-6pm and by appointment

Eyedrum Gallery 88 Forsyth Street SW Atlanta GA 30303

“Uneasiness In Culture is a new body of work from Atlanta artist Steve Morrison. Inspired by Freudian psychology, the ancient epic of Gilgamesh, puppetry and baking, this work explores natural cyclical processes of growth and decay and our collective need to interpret meaning. The multimedia show includes paintings, sculptures, and a series of animated video pieces. Steve’s surprising use of bread in various stages of development is unique and intriguing.

“The word ‘culture’ describes the yeast culture acting as a performance troupe as well as highlighting the uneasiness that some may be feeling in the present political situation.” — Steve Morrison

 

Society Superhero Art-Making Workshops with Joseph Bigley at The High

 

This coming Sunday, Feb 12th at the High Museum of Atlanta from 1-4 pm is a workshop with Joseph Bigley. He is one of this year's Idea Capital grant winners. 


Location: Greene Family Education Center, Lower Level, Stent Family Wing


Work with Spelman College students and High Museum teaching artist Joseph Bigley to create your own story for a superhero who helps the community. On the second Sunday of each month the museum offers free admission for all visitors and special family-friendly programming from 1 to 4 p.m.

To help ensure your family has a great experience at the High Museum, check out Second Sunday Social Story (información en español). This will give you a sense of what to expect during your visit.

Please note: Admission is free from 12 noon to 5 p.m. Programming takes place from 1 to 4 p.m.

One of Idea Capital grant winners Joseph Bigley at Eyedrum

Atlanta, Georgia, January 24, 2017—Product Placement is a single immersive kinetic sculptural installation by Atlanta-based artist and educator Joseph Bigley at Eyedrum Art and Music Gallery. Consistent with Bigley’s use of his studio practice as a form of social commentary, this work is a response to consumerism and commercialism. Product Placement consists of evenly spaced rows of hanging and inverted Christmas trees. The choice of this specific object embodies a notion of commodification in its limited use, even though the trees take, on average, seven years to develop into market-worthy products.

 

            The trees are connected to a motion sensor triggered by viewers entering the space. Once activated, the trees begin to swing at random intervals, moved by motors that are controlled by microprocessors. The motion and placement of the commercial products are not typical of their normal mode of interaction or growth, and pine needles shake off of the trees and form circular patterns on the floor. Incorporating the passage of time, the work rewards return visits as the trees shed their needles, resulting in bare stems and trunks, skeletons of sorts, that continue to swing in hapless and vulnerable memory of what once were living organisms.

 

            For many years Bigley lived in western North Carolina, where the Christmas tree industry is prominent and thriving. The farms of the industry disturb the mountain landscape and result in surreal forests of perfect rows, a bizarre combination with the otherwise natural surroundings. The industry’s pesticides and fertilizers wash into water supplies of local residents, who have documented cases of cancer in children, as well as detrimental effects to the local river ecosystems. The time needed for these plants to grow versus the short amount of time that they are used has been a source of curiosity for the artist, and was the starting point for this project.

 

            The opening reception for Product Placement takes place February 18, 6-11 pm; the exhibition is on view through March 4. A closing reception and artist talk are scheduled for March 4, 6-11 pm, with the artist talk to begin at 7 pm.

 

            Eyedrum Art and Music Gallery is a nonprofit artist-run collective, based in Atlanta, that fosters the experimental and avant-garde across disciplines to create opportunities for dialogue, collaboration, and growth in the contemporary art community. For more information, please visit www.eyedrum.org or the artist’s website, www.joebigley.com.

Tori Tinsley at Twin Radius

Echolalia opens Saturday, February 4!
Please join for the opening reception this Saturday from 6 to 9 PM
Twin Radius at CenterForm
115 Martin Luther King Jr., Dr. SW
Suite 3B/4B
Atlanta, GA 30303

For more information, click here.
 

Tori is an Idea Capital Grant Winner. Below she says,

 "My paintings explore my changing relationship with myself and with my mother as she succumbs to a brain disease called fronto-temporal degeneration. Through the interaction of two figures, I convey the challenging emotional experience of such an ambiguous loss; feelings that include despair, longing, disbelief, and even hope. This focus on myself is not meant to diminish the importance of my mother’s experience with this disease, but to add to the discussion and awareness of what happens to those left behind to pick up the pieces. These works not only serve as premature memorials to my mother, but they also stand as monuments to resilience and highlight how painting can serve as a proxy for reconnection."

Artist-funded grants seed creative ideas in 2017 by Andrew Alexander (AJC)

 

 

From a comic book about sports idolatry and a musical instrument carved from a wooden casket to an animated opera about rising bread dough and a dance duet focusing on the racial divisions inherent in the Southern country club tradition, a broad range of Atlanta artists’ most creative ideas will have an easier time coming to fruition this year thanks to the work of Idea Capital.

Since 2008, the nonprofit arts organization has sought to support the work of Atlanta artists by awarding small grants of about $500-1500 each to fund individual art projects. The recently announced list of Idea Capital’s 2017 grantees contains, as it does each year, a diverse lineup of artists working in many different disciplines.

“There’s a lot of creativity in Atlanta, and a lot of interesting ideas,” says co-founder Louise Shaw, who works as curator at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum. Shaw and several other arts administrators and supporters were motivated to take action eight years ago during what she describes as a “low point” in the Atlanta arts scene.

“A lot of funding had gone away,” she recalls. “We were just in the doldrums and couldn’t get out of it. The idea was to gather a few people together to give money to give grants to artists to stimulate the arts.”

Led by arts entrepreneur Stuart Keeler, the five original members each gave $100 and ended up awarding their first grant to Atlanta performance artist Allison Rentz. Through the years, the fundraising efforts of Idea Capital have increased, and the organization has grown to become a nonprofit that has now awarded nearly 70 grants for projects by Atlanta artists.

The funding model draws on small donations from members of the arts community, often artists themselves, that is then redistributed to fund specific projects. In keeping with the organization’s “from the community, for the community” philosophy, there are no levels of giving as there are in many nonprofits; all donors receive the same recognition regardless of the size of their donation. And each year, a donor is chosen at random to sit on the selection committee that chooses the awarded artists from the pool of applicants.

“What’s really amazing is that since 2008 the arts landscape in Atlanta has really improved,” says Shaw. “We finally got out of that horrible time we were in, and things are more energetic. We like to think that Idea Capital was one of the catalysts because we were directly supporting artists. To this day, that’s what we do.”

A look at Idea Capital’s 2017 projects follows.

• Fashion designer Charity Harris will stage a conceptual fashion show called “Southernoids II” using textiles to create “wearable sculptures” intended to evoke the South’s difficult history with nature, race, gender and religion.

• For his piece “Sphere of Influence,” performer Joseph Bigley will use woodworking techniques to create a musical instrument crafted from a casket on which he’ll perform an array of hymns, anthems and commercial jingles.

• Artist Bella Dorado’s multimedia show and installation “Gallery de Latinidad” will examine the American Latino experience through performance, a salon, bookstore and gallery.

• Artist Chris Chambers will create a comic book, “Super Duper Sportsball Follies of Man,” based on the conventionalized narratives of aspiration, failure and celebration found in sports films.

• Animator Steve Morrison will create an animated short, “Air (Opera for Yeast in One Act),” in which rising bread dough will convey the rhythms of breath.

• Multimedia artist Adam Forrester’s work, “Devil Town,” will be part media archive, part traveling exhibition and part printed tabloid through which he’ll consider the history of his hometown, Phenix City, Ala., where a notorious criminal network of drugs, gambling and prostitution once flourished, leading to the city’s nickname as the “Wickedest City in America.”

• Curator Kirstie Tepper’s organization Selvage will create an installation, “The Mystery of Stark Alley,” set in the alley behind author Carson McCullers’ childhood home in Columbus to convey the literal and figurative dividing lines of race, class and public and private in the South.

• Puppeteers Raymond Carr and Raymond Wade Tilton will create a multimedia performance, “Raymond Vs. Raymond: The Black and White Show,” to address the theme of race.

• In her project “Just Camping,” photographer Olga Sidilkovskaya will use black-and-white silver gelatin photographs to document the landscape and architecture of the Federal Emergency Management Agency camps used to house immigrants and others in Georgia.

• In “Manifesto,” her first foray into video work after working primarily as a photographer, Sarah Hobbs will take her interest in representing extreme psychological states into the new medium, with a performer acting out an intense psychological experience in a short film.

• Choreographer and dancer Melissa Word’s “Country Club,” a duet for white female dancers featuring an original composition, will be a meditation on race, power and privilege in the American South.

Idea Capital has been nominated for an ArtsATL Luminary Award!

Idea Capital is proud to announce we have been nominated for an inaugural ArtsATL Luminary Award!  

As a means for highlighting and celebrating contributors to the Atlanta arts community, ArtsATL has created the Luminary Awards.  Nominations for the four multidisciplinary prizes were open to the general public and a distinguished board of panelist will make the final decisions, to be announced on January 22, 2017 at Terminal West.  

“With so much happening and changing within Atlanta, we feel it’s crucial to step back and celebrate the individuals making thoughtful and important contributions to our arts community,” says ArtsATL Executive Editor Laura Relyea.

Extended Deadline

Lucky you! We’ve extended our Idea Capital deadline to October 25, 2016 so it’s not too late to apply for a 2016 Idea Capital grant.  

 

Are you a visual artist, filmmaker, writer, performance artist, musician or creative living in the Atlanta-area creating outside-the-box, experimental work? We invite you to apply for one of our annual grants ranging from $500 to $2,000.

 

Apply now! http://www.ideacapitalatlanta. org/apply

Idea Capital 2016 Grant Application is open

The 2016 Idea Capital Grant Application is open to Atlanta area artists.  Grant awards range from $500 to $2000 and special grants include the Margaret Kargbo Artist as Activist Grant and the Idea Capital Research & Development Travel Grant.  The deadline for applications is October 25th. 

Please help us share the news!

To apply: www.ideacapitalatlanta.org

3BQ: Burlesque, Barbeque & Bourbon

A little risqué, a little raucous, and a whole lot of fun.  Support southern activist artists working on the front lines of the most pressing issues of our times.  

Paris on Ponce's Le' Maison Rouge, October 24, 2015.

Featuring Atlanta's own Sadie Hawkins and introducing, straight from Texas, St. Shimi as The Black Orchid.

Space is limited.  Tickets can be purchased at www.alternateroots.org.

Please join us on for our Annual Fundraising Party on Sunday Sept 20th from 4-7pm

Join Idea Capital for a memorable afternoon of Art & Architecture featuring rousing entertainment, delicious food and bracing libations as we celebrate our 2015 fundraising cycle. Enjoy an inventive Art & Architecture-themed feast from the savory to the sweet prepared by the IdeaCapital Steering Committee, as you take in performances by 2015 grant winners including performances by the fabulous Jared Dawson and artist Masud Olufani, all in the modern surroundings of Oscar and Sylvia Harris’s beautiful Cascade Heights estate in the prestigious neighborhood that Shirley Franklin, former UN ambassador Andrew Young, Hank Aaron and congressman John Lewis call home.

Announcing the Margaret Kargbo Artist as Activist Grant

To honor the spirit of Margaret Kargbo, Idea Capital steering committee member who tragically died in May 2015, we are announcing the award of an annual grant in Margaret’s name.  Margaret was an art activist and social justice proponent, who believed in the power of art as a change agent.  On an annual basis, Idea Capital will select an artist among all the applicants whose project most embodies Margaret’s indomitable commitment to community-building.